Archive for the Karpov Category

29 May: Simul action in the Chess Corner

Posted in Chess Tigers on Tour, Karpov, Kasparov with tags , , , , , , on May 29, 2012 by Chessurfer

Now that we are getting very close to the end of the 2012 world chess championship and to the final entries of this blog, I will show you a few pictures I made during various simultaneous displays which were organized in the Chess Corner in the courtyard of the Tretyakov Gallery. Since I had to be in the playing hall during the games, and visited the press center and the VIP lounge between the moves, I missed some of the simuls. A lot of top Russian players gave simuls during the championship: Valentina Gunina, Anatoly Karpov, Ian Neponmiachtchi, Sergey Karjakin, Vladimir Potkin and many others. Most attention was given to the simultaneous display by Garry Kasparov, who played against 14 Russian and European champions in their age categories.  It took Garry Kimovich more than three hours to finish the simul and he had to fight pretty hard for his +12=2-0 score.

Pictures of the simuls

It was quite a nail-biting simul for the old master. Kasparov  normally does not like to play simuls against 1800+ players, but here he picked up the gauntlet: some of the biggest Russian talents proved to be a tough nut to crack.

This is 16 year old Maria Severina (ELO 2247) European Champion U16, who also played in the Blondes vs. Brunettes match.

Much to the enjoyment of the audience, Kasparov took his time for his moves. Here is is thinking about a move in his game against…

Kirill Kozionov, holder of the 2011 Cup of Russia up to age 14, ELO 2279. Kirill scored a draw.

And there was another draw for this 9 (!) year old girl: Ekaterina Goltseva , U10 Champion of Russia, ELO 1628. Remember her name! You can read an interview with her (in English) on this Russian website: http://www.chess-news.ru/en/node/7526/page/to/like. You can also replay her game against Kasparov on that site.

Another ex-world champion in action: Anatoly Karpov, playing against a visually handicapped young player on a special chess board.

After the simul “Tolya” was happy to sign a few books and other stuff.

And he had to pose with your Chessurfer! Picture taken by HWS.

Vladimir Potkin, European Champion 2011, ELO 2647, playing a simul under the watchful eye of HWS.

Another strong Russian grandmaster doing a simul: Vladimir Belov (ELO 2641) playing against youngsters. In the back you can see Potkin.

And here she is again: Maria Severina, playing against Belov. She had a busy week and probably played some more simuls I do not know of.

Excitement

For many players, especially young chess players, it is a very exciting experience to play in a simul against a top player. I can remember how excited I was during my first ever simul against Dutch legend Jan Timman back in 1983 (draw!).  It is always heartwarming to see the expression on the face of the players, when the grandmaster comes closer and closer and closer…

“Hah, that was a good move, eh?”

“Please, not that move, please don’t”.

Very concentrated.

A bit cheeky, I would say.

Better look at your own position missy, you are next!

This young lad was just happy: a game against Kasparov, a nice spot in the sun and daddy wrote down the moves of the game.

Daddy! Kasparov is coming!

22 May: Photo reconnaissance

Posted in Karpov, Kasparov, press with tags , on May 22, 2012 by Chessurfer

In an earlier post, on 11 May, I wrote that I had skimmed some Russian newspapers in the hotel , looking for news and pictures about the 2012 match and chess in general. In “Vedomosti” (Russian: Ведомости, literally “The Record”, http://www.vedomosti.ru/eng) I found this picture  in the Sports section. I had never seen this lovely picture from the 1985-1986 match between Gary Kasparov and Anatoly Karpov.

In the Multimedia Art Museum in Moscow, I discovered the picture in the exhibition: “Chess figures of the 20th Century”.

And the text that goes with the picture:

Question answered.

18 May: Opening ceremony – part 3/3

Posted in Gelfand, Gorbachev, Karpov, Moscow, Tretyakov with tags , , , , , on May 18, 2012 by Chessurfer

This is the last picture gallery of the opening ceremony, that took place on 11 May in the Tretyakov Gallery. Chicks and chessplayers, oil traders, FIDE officials and a former Soviet President attended the ceremony and the cocktail party. An enjoyable evening, with the best drinks and fingerfood, talking business and chess.

Pictures: piano concert and cocktail party

After the speeches, Denis Matsuev entered the stage.

 Denis Leonidovich Matsuev (Дени́с Леони́дович Мацу́ев; born June 11, 1975) is a Russian pianist, one of the most popular classical music performers of his generation, the winner of the International Tchaikovsky Competition in 1998 in Moscow, laureate of esteemed Shostakovich Prize in Music and State Prize of Russian Federation in Literature and Arts. Today the name of Denis Matsuev is known to the whole world. The man, whose career started so dramatically and in such a young age, is now associated with one of the best world pianists, who managed to mix in his performances the grandest of Russian traditions and innovatory creative conceptions, high quality of concert programmes and moving rendering.

One more interview after the piano concert. The players did not attend the cocktail party. In the back you can see Denis Matsuev packing up his piano.

After the concert, the cocktail party took place in the most beautiful setting possible in one of the galleries of the Tretyakov. Look at those paintings.

Some nitwits just put their empy glasses next to valuable statues, much to the chagrin of the Tretyakov staff.

 “A glass of champagne, Sir?”

 The highly decorated legend Yuri Lvovich Averbakh talking to English GM Nigel David Short. “Did you try the champagne yet”?

Former world champion Anatoly Yevgenyevich Karpov (Russian: Анато́лий Евге́ньевич Ка́рпов, born May 23, 1951) attended the party.   He was the official world champion from 1975 to 1985 when he was defeated by Garry Kasparov. He played three matches against Kasparov for the title from 1986 to 1990, before becoming FIDE World Champion once again after Kasparov broke away from FIDE in 1993. He held the title until 1999, when he resigned his title in protest against FIDE’s new world championship rules.

Karpov chatting with former president Mikhail Gorbachev and FIDE president Kirsan Ilyumzhinov. It’s a small world.

New in Chess editor-in-chief Dirk-Jan ten Geuzendam enjoying a glass of champagne with Ilya Levitov, Chairman of the Management Board of the Russian Chess Federation. “Tell me Dirk-Jan, how to knot a tie?”

Sergey Alexandrovich Karjakin born January 12, 1990 in Simferopol enjoying the fine fingerfood with Hans-Walter Schmitt and the beautiful young woman in the center, whose name I do not know. Shame on me! If anyone knows her name (and telephone number) let me know!

Update 18 May, 23:05: Macauley Peterson, who is following the blog in St.Louis at the US Championship, knows who the beauty in the center is: Galiya Kamalova. He even has her phone number! Thanks!

This is Mr. Vasily Zhukov, talking to HWS, who retired as president of the Moscow Chess Federation this February. He invited HWS and your @Chessurfer to visit famous chess clubs in Moscow on a free day. Zhukov is a highly decorated scientist, founder and rector of the Russian State Social University, a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Honoured Scientist of the Russian federation, Laureate of the State Prize of the Russian Federation in the field of education.  In 2011 Mr. Zhukov was awarded the Order of Holy Prince Daniel of Moscow II degree.

After the party, everybody was sent home with this limited edition medal. Check Ebay….

 ..and the other side of the medal.

 The final shot of the opening is reserved for our favourite photographer.

14 May: Opening ceremony- part 2/3

Posted in Anand, Dvorkovich, Gelfand, Gorbachev, Karpov, Moscow, Tretyakov with tags , , , , , on May 14, 2012 by Chessurfer

As promised in an earlier post, I will show you some more pictures of the opening ceremony in the Tretyakov Gallery on Friday, 11 May. Legendary chess players, billionaire oil traders, Kremlin insiders, a world famous piano player, celeb chicks and many other VIP guests attended the ceremony. It provided a “glimpse of the weird and politically connected Russian chess scene”, as the Moscow Times stated in Monday 14 May issue. Read the report in the newspaper about the opening press conference and the ceremony here: http://www.themoscowtimes.com/arts_n_ideas/article/world-chess-championship-starts-in-moscow/458432.html.

Opening ceremony

After the opening press conference, only accredited  photographers and cameramen were allowed to come to the official opening and they ran into the hall to get the best position for some nice shots of the players and the VIPs.

I still wonder how this unaccredited photographer made it into the official ceremony? She must have had some good arguments. 

Most interviewed VIP this evening was former President Mikhail Gorbachev. I managed to shake his hand and say hello.

After having a short chat with Gorbi, the interviewers moved on to match sponsor Andrei Filatov, who brought his sweet little daughter to the opening.

Gelfand: “Hey Vishy, why do these photographers only have eyes for Gorbi. We are supposed to be the main actors.”

Anand:” I have done this before. Let’s shake hands and you will see how these guys will run in our direction”.

Gelfand: “Haha, good idea. Look, they are coming.”

“Yeah, we did it!”

Back to business: Aruna and Vishy Anand with the Ambassador of India, Ajai Malhotra.

In the front: Arkady Dvorkovich, chairman of the Russian chess federation and presidential economic aide, chatting with former President Mikhail Gorbachev and FIDE President/alien abductee Kirsan Ilyumzhinov.

Drawing of colours- exclusive pictures! 

After a few speeches by dignitaries like Dvorkovich,  Ilyumzhinov and the players, it was time for the drawing of colours. The official site http://moscow2012.fide.com/en/ describes the draing as follows:  “Ashot Vardapetyan, the Chief Arbiter of the competition, held the draw in an original style which emphasised the unbreakable connection between chess and world culture. “Paintings” were displayed on easels on the stage, depicting diagrams of two games that Anand and Gelfand had played previously (back in the 1990s). One of these contests had been won beautifully by the current world champion, while the other ended in a striking victory for the challenger.

Two small wooden boxes had been prepared for the grandmasters, containing pots of paint and brushes. Anand was given first choice, as world champion. The players approached their “paintings” – each one, of course, going to the game which he had succeeded in winning – dipped their brushes in the paint and signed the “canvas”. At that moment, the spectators saw that Anand had signed his picture with white paint, and Gelfand had signed his with black. Thus in the first round the world champion would play with White.

Puh, quite an effort to arrange something simple like the drawing of colours. “Normal” chessplayers usually take a white and a black pawn, hide them behind the back and the opponent says “right hand or left hand”. But ok, “normal” chess players do not play chess in one of the most prominent galleries in the world

In this blog I promised to show you some off-stage pictures. Ok, ok, here a a few truly “exclusive pictures”. During the inspection of the playing hall, Anand and Gelfand rehearsed the painting procedure in the basement and here are some of the pictures I made. I promised to wait a few days before publishing the pictures here.

Leonardo d’ Anand in action.

“I hope that my son Akhil does not start painting on my chessboards”

Boris Dali tries three different squares.

The final result of the rehearsal. Wonder what they do with this board.

Anand: “Hmm, I like the one from the rehearsal better. You can hardly see the white paint on the board. Hey wait, they changed the position!”

“Yes Vishy, this is the game I won”.

By popular demand: Yes, there will be a part 3!

Because several people in the press room asked when I will publish more pictures of the opening ceremony and afterparty, I will do  one more  picture gallery of the opening. So there is even more to come! Candid, exclusive, original, sexy!

11 May: Chair testing for dummies

Posted in Karpov, Kasparov, Moscow, The match 2012 on May 12, 2012 by Chessurfer

In a previous post about the inspection of the playing hall in the Tretyakov Gallery, I mentioned that the players had the possibility to choose between three different chairs. They looked comfortable, but the players eventually chose the most stable and conventional chair. No massage functions or any bells and whistles needed, obviously.

In his book “It’s only me“, the late  GM Tony Miles  tells his  personal and fascinating article about “Tilburg 1985”, a tournament that Miles played most of while lying on a stretcher! This was due to a back condition, and such a mode of play led to considerable controversy. Miles tied for first in the tournament.

Tony Miles, Tilburg 1985.

Chair testing in Moscow

“My son Akhil would love this chair, great chair to see-saw”.

Boris is checking the seat for bugs… or are they just checking how to adjust the seat? Anna Zakharova and Gelfands mental coach Armen Aguzumstyan, who is checking another chair are watching.

Bobby’s chair paranoia

Chessplayers are certainly familiar with this story about the 1972 world chess championship match in Iceland: This is a story told by Nikolai Krogius. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikolai_Krogius)

“We received a lot of letters about the underhand ways in which Fischer was trying to influence Spassky’s mind… Starting with some sort of power source allegedly installed in a submarine somewhere or in the Keflavik and finishing with the idea that a generator has been installed in Fischer’s chair…and every time he got up he shifted the chair…and the generator would come on and this would direct rays at Spassky…Then Fischer would return to his chair, sit down again…and the device would be switched off.”

Now we come to the reason why I write about a usually boring subject. In the hotel I skimmed some Russian newspapers, looking for news and pictures about the 2012 match. In “Vedomosti” (Russian: Ведомости, literally “The Record”, http://www.vedomosti.ru/eng) I found this picture  in the Sports section last Friday. I had never seen this lovely picture of the 1985-1986 match between Gary Kasparov and Anatoly Karpov.

If anybody knows the story behind this picture, please let me know, so I will be able to update the story. Спасиьа.